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Category Archives: Space

Federal Register: NASA Statement of Organization and General Information

NASA published adirect final rule on Statement of Organization and General Information (PDF) in the Federal Register (78 Fed. Reg. 18443-18444):

SUMMARY: This direct final rule makes nonsubstantive changes by removing language related to general information on NASA’s organizations because the most current information is maintained in other regulations and on NASA’s Organization Structure Web site. Therefore, this regulation will be streamlined to make reference to those locations to ensure that the public is provided with the most current information accessible on NASA. The revisions to this rule is part of NASA’s retrospective plan under EO 13563 completed in August 2011. NASA’s full plan can be accessed on the Agency’s open government Web site at http://www.nasa.gov/open/.

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European Parliament decision of 3 April 2014 on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012 (C7-0319/2013 – 2013/2231(DEC))

Source – European Parliament:

1.European Parliament decision of 3 April 2014 on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012 (C7-0319/2013 – 2013/2231(DEC))

The European Parliament ,

– having regard to the final annual accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012,

– having regard to the Court of Auditors’ report on the annual accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012, together with the Agency’s replies(1) ,

– having regard to the Council’s recommendation of 18 February 2014 (05849/2014 – C7-0054/2014),

– having regard to Article 319 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

– having regard to Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 of 25 June 2002 on the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities(2) , and in particular Article 185 thereof,

– having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(3) , and in particular Article 208 thereof,

– having regard to Regulation (EU) No 912/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2010 setting up the European GNSS Agency(4) , and in particular Article 14 thereof,

– having regard to Commission Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 2343/2002 of 19 November 2002 on the framework Financial Regulation for the bodies referred to in Article 185 of Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 on the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities(5) ,

– having regard to Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 1271/2013 of 30 September 2013 on the framework financial regulation for the bodies referred to in Article 208 of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council(6) , and in particular Article 108 thereof,

– having regard to Rule 77 of, and Annex VI to, its Rules of Procedure,

– having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgetary Control (A7-0223/2014),

1. Grants the Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency discharge in respect of the implementation of the Authority’s budget for the financial year 2012;

2. Sets out its observations in the resolution below;

3. Instructs its President to forward this Decision and the resolution that forms an integral part of it to the Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency, the Council, the Commission and the Court of Auditors, and to arrange for their publication in the Official Journal of the European Union (L series).

(1) OJ C 365, 13.12.2013, p. 261.
(2) OJ L 248, 16.9.2002, p. 1.
(3) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(4) OJ L 276, 20.10.2010,p. 11.
(5) OJ L 357, 31.12.2002, p. 72.
(6) OJ L 328, 7.12.2013, p. 42.

2.European Parliament decision of 3 April 2014 on the closure of the accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012 (C7-0319/2013 – 2013/2231(DEC))

The European Parliament ,

– having regard to the final annual accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012,

– having regard to the Court of Auditors’ report on the annual accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012, together with the Agency’s replies(1) ,

– having regard to the Council’s recommendation of 18 February 2014 (05849/2014 – C7-0054/2014),

– having regard to Article 319 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

– having regard to the Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 of 25 June 2002 on the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities(2) , and in particular Article 185 thereof,

– having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(3) , and in particular Article 208 thereof,

– having regard to Regulation (EU) No 912/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2010 setting up the European GNSS Agency(4) , and in particular Article 14 thereof,

– having regard to Commission Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 2343/2002 of 19 November 2002 on the framework Financial Regulation for the bodies referred to in Article 185 of Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 on the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities(5) ,

– having regard to Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 1271/2013 of 30 September 2013 on the framework financial regulation for the bodies referred to in Article 208 of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council(6) , and in particular Article 108 thereof,

– having regard to Rule 77 of, and Annex VI to, its Rules of Procedure,

– having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgetary Control (A7-0223/2014),

1. Approves the closure of the accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012;

2. Instructs its President to forward this Decision to the Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency, the Council, the Commission and the Court of Auditors, and to arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union (L series).

(1) OJ C 365, 13.12.2013, p. 261.
(2) OJ L 248, 16.9.2002, p. 1.
(3) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(4) OJ L 276, 20.10.2010,p. 11.
(5) OJ L 357, 31.12.2002, p. 72.
(6) OJ L 328, 7.12.2013, p. 42.

3.European Parliament resolution of 3 April 2014 with observations forming an integral part of its Decision on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012 (C7-0319/2013 – 2013/2231(DEC))

The European Parliament ,

– having regard to the final annual accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012,

– having regard to the Court of Auditors’ report on the annual accounts of the European GNSS Agency for the financial year 2012, together with the Agency’s replies(1) ,

– having regard to the Council’s recommendation of 18 February 2014 (05849/2014 – C7-0054/2014),

– having regard to Article 319 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

– having regard to the Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 of 25 June 2002 on the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities(2) , and in particular Article 185 thereof,

– having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(3) , and in particular Article 208 thereof,

– having regard to Regulation (EU) No 912/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2010 setting up the European GNSS Agency(4) , and in particular Article 14 thereof,

– having regard to Commission Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 2343/2002 of 19 November 2002 on the framework Financial Regulation for the bodies referred to in Article 185 of Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 on the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities(5) ,

– having regard to Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 1271/2013 of 30 September 2013 on the framework financial regulation for the bodies referred to in Article 208 of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council(6) , and in particular Article 108 thereof,

– having regard to its previous discharge decisions and resolutions,

– having regard to Rule 77 of, and Annex VI to, its Rules of Procedure,

– having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgetary Control (A7-0223/2014),

A. whereas according to its financial statements, the budget of the European GNSS Agency (‘the Agency’) for the financial year 2012 was EUR 20 848 718, representing a decrease of 46,12 % compared to 2011,

B. whereas the Court of Auditors has stated that it has obtained reasonable assurances that the Agency’s annual accounts for the financial year 2012 are reliable and that the underlying transactions are legal and regular,

Budget and financial management

1. Notes that budget monitoring efforts during the financial year 2012 resulted in a budget implementation rate of 100 % and that the payment appropriations execution rate was 99,99 %;

Commitments and carryovers

2. Acknowledges from the Court of Auditors’ report that the overall level of committed appropriations was close to 100 % for all titles;

3. Notes that the carry-over of committed appropriations was relatively high for title II (administrative expenditure) at EUR 1 700 000 (38 %); acknowledges that this was partly due to events beyond the Authority’s control, such as the relocation of its seat to Prague in September 2012 (EUR 400 000) and the setting-up of the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (EUR 400 000) which necessitated the provision of certain goods and services in the last quarter of the year; notes, moreover, that several contracts relating to IT and legal services included in the 2013 work programme were signed in December 2012;

Transfers

4. Notes that an amount of EUR 700 000 was transferred from title I (staff expenditure) to title II in November 2012;

Procurement and recruitment procedures

5. Notes with concern that the Court of Auditors identified weaknesses in the recruitment procedures audited which affected transparency and equal treatment, namely the fact that no threshold scores were determined for admission to written tests and interviews or for inclusion in the list of suitable candidates and the fact that the vacancy notices made no provision for appeals by rejected candidates;

6. Notes that the Court, in its annual audit report for 2012, made no comments as regards the Agency’s procurement procedures;

Prevention and management of conflicts of interests and transparency

7. Regrets that the Agency did not answer questionnaire on the management and prevention of conflicts of interests; urges the Agency to report to the discharge authority on the actions it has implemented to become in line with the Court of Auditors’ Special Report No 15/2012 and Parliament’s recommendations that all agencies develop and implement comprehensive independence policies and procedures, inter alia, by establishing a breach of trust mechanism and clear penalties, or by changing those already in place;

8. Observes that the CVs and declarations of interests of the members of the Administrative Board, as well as the declarations of interests of the Executive Director and senior management are not publicly available; calls on the Agency to remedy the situation as a matter of urgency;

Internal audit

9. Acknowledges from the Agency that in 2012, the Commission’s Internal Audit Service (IAS) carried out a risk assessment and a follow-up engagement in accordance with the Strategic Audit Plan of the Agency; notes that there were no open critical or very important recommendations stemming from the previous IAS audit reports; notes, however, that in the course of the risk analysis, the IAS identified certain processes of high inherent risk which could not be considered as auditable within the audit plan as the controls were assessed as absent or insufficient; notes that the Agency’s management submitted an action plan aimed at addressing those weaknesses adequately;

Performance

10. Requests that the Agency communicate the results and impact its work has on European citizens in an accessible way, mainly through its website;

o
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11. Refers, in respect of the other observations accompanying its Decision on discharge, which are of a horizontal nature, to its resolution of 3 April 2014(7) on the performance, financial management and control of the agencies.

(1) OJ C 365, 13.12.2013, p. 261.
(2) OJ L 248, 16.9.2002, p. 1.
(3) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(4) OJ L 276, 20.10.2010,p. 11.
(5) OJ L 357, 31.12.2002, p. 72.
(6) OJ L 328, 7.12.2013, p. 42.
(7) Texts adopted, P7_TA-PROV(2014)0299.

Russia-China Cooperation on GNSS

Source – ITAR-TASS:

Russia, China eye cooperation of GLONASS and BeiDou navigation systems
April 18, 11:56 UTC+4

VLADIVOSTOK, April 18. /ITAR-TASS/. Russia and China see prospects of cooperation related with satellite navigation systems GLONASS and BeiDou in regional support and development of chipsets, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin told reporters on Friday.

Dmitry Rogozin was taking part in a meeting of co-chairs of Russian-Chinese committee for preparation of regular meetings between the countries’ prime ministers, which took place in Vladivostok on Friday. . . .[Full Story]

FCC Satcom Documents 3/31/14-4/17/14

Federal Communications satcom documents, 3/31/14-4/17/14:

REVISIONS OF PARTS 2 AND 25 OF THE COMMISSION’S RULES TO GOVERN THE USE OF EARTH STATIONS ABOARD AIRCRAFT COMMUNICATING WITH FIXED-SATELLITE SERVICE GEOSTATIONARY-ORBIT SPACE STATIONS. Revised Parts 2 and 25 of the Commission’s Rules, to elevate ESSA Stations from secondary to primary status, and to respond to a petition for reconsideration and clarification. by Second Report and Order. (Dkt No. 12-376 ). Action by: the Commission. Adopted: 04/17/2014 by Order on Reconsideration. (FCC No. 14-45). IB

<a href=”http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-512A1.pdfX2NSAT. Dismissed X2nSat’s application without prejudice to re-filing. Action by: Chief, Systems Analysis Branch, Satellite Division, International Bureau by LETTER. (DA No. 14-512). IB

Report No: SES-01638 Released: 04/16/2014. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES re: Satellite Radio Applications Accepted for Filing. IB

Report No: SES-01639 Released: 04/16/2014. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES INFORMATION re: Actions Taken. IB

Report No: SES-01636 Released: 04/09/2014. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES re: Satellite Radio Applications Accepted for Filing. IB

Report No: SES-01637 Released: 04/09/2014. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES INFORMATION re: Actions Taken. IB

SES AMERICOM, INC. APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO OPERATE THE SES-3 SATELLITE AT 103 DEGREES W.L. Authorized SES Americom, Inc. to operate the SES-3 Call Sign S2892 at the 103 Degrees W.L. orbital location for TT&C and for two Ku-band beacons, for purposes of preparing, at its own risk, for transitioning service from AMC-1 to SES-3. Action by: Chief, International Bureau. Adopted: 04/04/2014 by ORDER. (DA No. 14-462). IB

Report No: SAT-01008 Released: 04/04/2014. POLICY BRANCH INFORMATION. (DA No. 14-454) Actions Taken.

Report No: SAT-01007 Released: 04/04/2014. POLICY BRANCH INFORMATION Satellite Space Applications Accepted for Filing. IB

Report No: SES-01634 Released: 04/02/2014. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES re: Satellite Radio Applications Accepted for Filing. IB

Report No: SES-01635 Released: 04/02/2014. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES INFORMATION re: Actions Taken. IB

SPACE DATA SPECTRUM HOLDINGS, LLC. Granted Space Data’s Request for Extension of its tribal land bidding credit construction deadline for AWS Station WQIA880, and its request for waiver of 47 C.F.R. Section 1.2110(f)(3)(viii). Action by: Deputy Chief, Broadband Division, Wireless Telecommunications Bureau. Adopted: 03/31/2014 by MO&O. (DA No. 14-437). WTB

H.R. 4412: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2014

H.R. 4412: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2014 was introduced on April 7, 2013 by Rep. Steven Palazzo (R – MS):

H.R.4412 — National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2014 (Introduced in House – IH)

Beginning
April 7, 2014
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.
TITLE I–AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS
SEC. 101. FISCAL YEAR 2014.
TITLE II–HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT
Subtitle A–Exploration
SEC. 201. SPACE EXPLORATION POLICY.
SEC. 202. STEPPING STONE APPROACH TO EXPLORATION.
`Sec. 70504. Stepping stone approach to exploration
SEC. 203. SPACE LAUNCH SYSTEM.
SEC. 204. ORION CREW CAPSULE.
SEC. 205. ADVANCED BOOSTER COMPETITION.
Subtitle B–Space Operations
SEC. 211. FINDINGS.
SEC. 212. INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION.
SEC. 213. COMMERCIAL CREW REPORT.
SEC. 214. FLIGHT READINESS DEMONSTRATION.
SEC. 215. AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL ADVICE.
SEC. 216. SPACE COMMUNICATIONS.
TITLE III–SCIENCE
Subtitle A–General
SEC. 301. SCIENCE PORTFOLIO.
`SEC. 803. OVERALL SCIENCE PORTFOLIO; SENSE OF CONGRESS.
SEC. 302. ASSESSMENT OF SCIENCE MISSION EXTENSIONS.
`Sec. 30504. Assessment of science mission extensions
SEC. 303. RADIOISOTOPE THERMOELECTRIC GENERATORS.
SEC. 304. CONGRESSIONAL DECLARATION OF POLICY AND PURPOSE.
SEC. 305. UTILIZATION OF INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION FOR SCIENCE MISSIONS.
Subtitle B–Astrophysics
SEC. 311. DECADAL CADENCE.
SEC. 312. EXTRASOLAR PLANET EXPLORATION STRATEGY.
SEC. 313. JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE.
SEC. 314. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY TELESCOPE.
SEC. 315. NATIONAL RECONNAISSANCE OFFICE TELESCOPE DONATION.
Subtitle C–Planetary Science
SEC. 321. DECADAL CADENCE.
SEC. 322. NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS.
SEC. 323. ASTROBIOLOGY STRATEGY.
SEC. 324. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS.
Subtitle D–Heliophysics
SEC. 331. DECADAL CADENCE.
SEC. 332. REVIEW OF SPACE WEATHER.
SEC. 333. DEEP SPACE CLIMATE OBSERVATORY.
Subtitle E–Earth Science
SEC. 341. GOAL.
SEC. 342. DECADAL CADENCE.
SEC. 343. RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS.
SEC. 344. INTERAGENCY COORDINATION.
SEC. 345. JOINT POLAR SATELLITE SYSTEM CLIMATE SENSORS.
SEC. 346. LAND IMAGING.
SEC. 347. SOURCES OF EARTH SCIENCE DATA.
TITLE IV–AERONAUTICS
SEC. 401. SENSE OF CONGRESS.
SEC. 402. UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.
SEC. 403. RESEARCH PROGRAM ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS USED IN AERONAUTICS.
SEC. 404. HYPERSONIC RESEARCH.
SEC. 405. SUPERSONIC RESEARCH.
SEC. 406. RESEARCH ON NEXTGEN AIRSPACE MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS AND TOOLS.
SEC. 407. ROTORCRAFT RESEARCH.
TITLE V–SPACE TECHNOLOGY
SEC. 501. SPACE TECHNOLOGY.
`Sec. 70507. Space Technology Program authorized
SEC. 502. UTILIZATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION FOR TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATIONS.
TITLE VI–EDUCATION
SEC. 601. EDUCATION.
SEC. 602. INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL SPACE GRANT COLLEGE AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.
TITLE VII–POLICY PROVISIONS
SEC. 701. ASTEROID RETRIEVAL MISSION.
SEC. 702. TERMINATION LIABILITY.
SEC. 703. BASELINE AND COST CONTROLS.
SEC. 704. PROJECT AND PROGRAM RESERVES.
SEC. 705. INDEPENDENT REVIEWS.
SEC. 706. SPACE ACT AGREEMENTS.
SEC. 707. HUMAN SPACEFLIGHT ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS.
SEC. 708. COMMERCIAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM.
SEC. 709. ORBITAL DEBRIS.
SEC. 710. NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL.
`Sec. 20118. NASA Advisory Council
SEC. 711. COST ESTIMATION.
SEC. 712. DETECTION AND AVOIDANCE OF COUNTERFEIT ELECTRONIC PARTS.
SEC. 713. PROHIBITION ON USE OF FUNDS FOR CONTRACTORS THAT HAVE COMMITTED FRAUD OR OTHER CRIMES.

S.J. Res 14-020: CONCERNING THE DESIGNATION OF MARCH 24, 2014, AS “COLORADO AEROSPACE DAY”, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, COMMEMORATING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COLORADO CHAPTER OF CITIZENS FOR SPACE EXPLORATION

The Colorado Legislature has passed S.J. Res 14-020: CONCERNING THE DESIGNATION OF MARCH 24, 2014, AS “COLORADO AEROSPACE DAY”, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, COMMEMORATING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COLORADO CHAPTER OF CITIZENS FOR SPACE EXPLORATION:

SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION 14-020
101 CONCERNING THE DESIGNATION OF MARCH 24, 2014, AS “COLORADO
102 AEROSPACE DAY”, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH,
103 COMMEMORATING THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COLORADO
104 CHAPTER OF CITIZENS FOR SPACE EXPLORATION.
1 WHEREAS, Our nation and the world have significantly benefited
2 from technological and scientific advances resulting from space
3 exploration and aerospace activities; and
4 WHEREAS, At the dawn of the space age, there were two nations
5 that could put people into space — the United States and the Soviet Union;
6 and
7 WHEREAS, Today there are still two nations that can put people
1 into space, but the United States is no longer one of them; and
2 WHEREAS, The United States has been replaced by China as the
3 second nation, alongside Russia, that can put people into space using their
4 own national assets; and
5 WHEREAS, The United States lost the ability to put people in
6 space with the end of NASA’s Space Shuttle Program in 2011 and now
7 has to transfer $70 million out of our economy and into the economy of
8 Russia for each astronaut our nation puts into space; and
9 WHEREAS, Colorado is key to regaining the United States’ ability
10 to send people into space again using our own national assets with
11 programs from several Colorado companies that are building the space
12 vehicles and launch systems necessary to restore our nation’s spaceflight
13 ability; and
14 WHEREAS, Key to Colorado’s prominence in aerospace are two
15 organizations — first, the Colorado Space Coalition, a group of industry
16 stakeholders, including aerospace companies, military leaders, academic
17 organizations, research centers, and economic development groups, who
18 promote Colorado’s significant space assets and advance legislation vital
19 to industry growth and to successfully working to make Colorado a center
20 of excellence for aerospace; and, second, the Colorado Space Business
21 Roundtable, a group that brings together aerospace stakeholders from
22 industry, government, and academia for roundtable discussions and
23 business development and that encourages grassroots citizen participation
24 in aerospace issues; and
25 WHEREAS, Restoring our nation’s leadership in space is
26 important to our national security and our ability to continue to lead the
27 world in technology and innovation, ensuring the economic security of
28 the United States; and
29 WHEREAS, Restoring our nation’s leadership in space depends on
30 our citizens understanding the importance and value of space because, for
31 all its problems, Congress does largely work as intended — members of
32 Congress react to the issues their constituents feel are important, and not
33 many citizens are telling their elected officials that they want to restore
34 our nation’s leadership in space; and
35 WHEREAS, For perspective, the first bank bailout in 2009 of
1 $850 billion was more money spent in one year than NASA has received
2 in its entire history; and
3 WHEREAS, The Colorado Space Business Roundtable is forming
4 a Colorado chapter of Citizens for Space Exploration, which will hold
5 several events each year where citizens will be invited to learn about
6 space, the value of space, and public policy involving space, with the goal
7 of informing citizens about the importance of space and restoring our
8 nation’s leadership and funding for space activities; now, therefore,
9 Be It Resolved by the Senate of the Sixty-ninth General Assembly
10 of the State of Colorado, the House of Representatives concurring herein:
11 (1) That we strongly urge and request the federal branches of
12 government to take action to preserve and enhance United States’
13 leadership in space, to spur aerospace innovation, and to ensure our
14 continued national and economic security by preserving and increasing
15 funding for space exploration and activities, including regaining the
16 ability of the United States to deliver persons and cargo to space by 2015
17 and committing to sending persons to destinations such as the moon,
18 Lagrange points, asteroids, and Mars within this decade or as soon as
19 technologically possible;
20 (2) That we commend the Colorado Space Business Roundtable
21 on its public outreach and organization efforts in forming a Colorado
22 chapter of Citizens for Space Exploration; and
23 (3) That we hereby declare March 24, 2014, to be “Colorado
24 Aerospace Day”.
25 Be It Further Resolved, That a copy of this Joint Resolution be
26 sent to Governor John Hickenlooper; Lieutenant Governor Joe Garcia;
27 Mr. Charles Huettner, Executive Director, Aerospace States Association;
28 Mr. Elliott Pulham, Chief Executive Officer, Space Foundation; Major
29 General (Retired) Andy Love, Co-chair, Colorado Space Coalition; Mr.
30 Tom Marsh, Co-chair, Colorado Space Coalition; Mr. Edgar Johansson,
31 President, Colorado Space Business Roundtable; Ms. Stacey DeFore,
32 Chair, Colorado Space Business Roundtable; Citizens for Space
33 Exploration; and the members of Colorado’s Congressional delegation.

ISPL: CERTIFICATE COURSE IN SPACE LAW AND POLICY (CPD*)

Source – London Institute of Space Policy and Law:

CERTIFICATE COURSE IN SPACE LAW AND POLICY (CPD*)

CHARLES CLORE HOUSE, RUSSELL SQUARE, LONDON

20 – 22 MAY 2014
ISPL is pleased to announce that enrolment is now open for the 2014 Space Law Course.

WHY STUDY AT ISPL?
ISPL is the only UK institution focusing on space policy and law, and one of a handful worldwide.
We provide participants with the knowledge to assess and to work with the existing space policies
and regulatory framework, and to be prepared for future changes.
The Course will comprise lectures and interactive case studies. Participants will have access to the
IALS Law Library during the course. Those considering a post-graduate degree at ISPL will also
be able to informally discuss their interest with the Director.

WHAT WILL THE COURSE COVER?
• The space environment and space technology
• Orbits, their characteristics and management, and types of spacecraft
• Spectrum management
• The law governing space activities: principles & sources of space law, including
conventions and treaties, national law and policies
• Comparison between space law and other legal regimes: Antarctic, maritime and air law
• Peaceful use of space, military activities & arms control
• Sovereignty
• Property rights
• Risk, liability and insurance
• The law as relates to specific applications: telecommunications and broadcasting, remote
sensing, scientific experiment and exploration, manned activities including the
International Space Station, unmanned activities
• Space policy and the institutions that implement them

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
The Course will be of interest to policy-makers, legal professionals, space sector executives and
engineers, officials of government and international bodies, academics and post-graduate degree

The course is designed to be accessible to those in legal, technical or business training or
employment. Previous knowledge of law or policy is not required. It will be particularly
appropriate for those working in the space sector who wish to increase their knowledge of the
current legal and policy framework, in order to take full advantage of the available opportunities
and to create new ones.

The Course will be valuable for a variety of individuals.
• Satellite manufacturing or operation team members seeking an understanding of legal
issues relating to design, manufacture or provision of space products and services
• Law, business and technology post-graduate students interested in the field
• Insurers and executives who want the tools to evaluate legal aspects of risk and liability
• Managers and team leaders of space operations who wish to better understand the legal
and policy issues they encounter, and to be able to plan more proactively
• IGO and space agency team members concerned with national and international issues
arising from activities in space, such as earth observation, and their regulation
• Lawyers and jurists whose practice brings them into contact with space law through legal
evidence from satellites, contractual matters or international commerce

Note: Undergraduates please register for our short course in space law later this year.
The course qualifies for 15 hours CPD for Solicitors (SRA) and for Barristers. Other
professionals: please contact your respective professional bodies about whether the course will
qualify for CPD.

SCHEDULE & TEACHING
The course will be limited to 20 participants, and will be taught by the Director and

Faculty of the Institute. A recommended reading list will be posted on the Teaching
page of our website, for those who wish to pursue the material in more depth.

Study sessions:

Tuesday 20 May 2014 9 – 12.30 13.45 – 17.15

Wednesday 21 May 9 – 12.30 13.45 – 17.15

Thursday 22 May 9 – 12.30

There will be breaks with refreshments at mid-morning and mid-afternoon.
The Lex Café on the premises provides a variety of light food, and there are a number of
dining options in the area for lunch.

Government, Teachers & Academics,
Current post-graduate candidates*, £ 525
Charity and IGO employees
All others £ 1,050

Payment is accepted only in UK Sterling.
* Proof of full-time enrolment at an accredited university is required.

REGISTRATION
Please email events@space-institute.org to request a reservation. Put “Space Law
Course” in the subject line, and be sure to include in the message your full name,
position, institutional affiliation (including department) and telephone number.

Your place will be confirmed when payment is received, on a 1st
Although we make every effort to accommodate institutional and corporate payment
procedures, we cannot guarantee to hold a place without payment. Please contact us if
you have a difficulty or require an invoice. Please be aware that enrolment is very

ISPL COURSES FOR PRACTITIONERS AND PROFESSIONALS
ISPL provides in-house courses to corporate, legal and government bodies in addition to
our regular seminars, workshops and courses. Please contact events@space-institute.org
to discuss your requirements.

SPACE LAW COURSE FOR UNDERGRADUATES
We also offer a one-day lecture course for undergraduate students currently enrolled in
academic institutions. It will cover the basic elements of space law. There will be one
short case study with student interaction.

Postgraduate candidates may choose to attend either course. Details of the one-day
course will be posted on our website when it is scheduled. Those who would like early
notification should contact events@space-institute.org.

Event: World Space Week 2014

Source – IAF:

WORLD SPACE WEEK 2014
World Space Week 2014
“The General Assembly declares 4 to 10 October World Space Week to celebrate each year at the international level the contributions of space science and technology to the betterment of the human condition”

UN General Assembly resolution, 6 December 1999

ABOUT WORLD SPACE WEEK

What is World Space Week?

It is an international celebration of science and technology, and their contribution to the betterment of the human condition. The United Nations General Assembly declared in 1999 that World Space Week will be held each year from October 4-10. These dates commemorate two events:

October 4, 1957: Launch of the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, thus opening the way for space exploration
October 10, 1967: The signing of the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activites of States in the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies.
Where and how is World Space Week celebrated?

World Space Week consists of space education and outreach events held by space agencies, aerospace companies, schools, planetaria, museums, and astronomy clubs around the world in a common timeframe. These synchronized space events attract greater public and media attention.
World Space Week 2013 achieved record scale:
1,400 events, nearly double that of prior year
Events in 80 nations
Total audience since 2007:
2,000,000 attendees
375,000,000 media impressions
The week is coordinated by the United Nations with the support of the World Space Week Association (WSWA). The WSWA leads a global team of National Coordinators, who promote the celebration of World Space Week within their own countries.
What are the goals of World Space Week?

Provide unique leverage in space outreach and education;
Educate people around the world about the benefits that they receive from space;
Encourage greater use of space for sustainable economic development;
Demonstrate public support for space programs;
Excite young people about science, technology, engineering, and maths;
Foster international cooperation in space outreach and education.

EU-US Summit: Joint Statement

Source – The White House:

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release March 26, 2014
EU-US Summit: Joint Statement

We, the leaders of the European Union and the United States, met today in Brussels to reaffirm our strong partnership. We reaffirmed our shared values of democracy, individual freedom, the rule of law and human rights, and a common commitment to open societies and economies. Starting from those values, the European Union and the United States work together every day to address issues of vital interest and importance to our citizens and the world. We strive to create jobs and sustainable growth through sound economic policies. We seek a landmark Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership to build our common prosperity. We undertake joint efforts to build security and stability around the globe and to tackle pressing global challenges like climate change. Today, we took stock of our achievements, set priorities and charted the way ahead for a stronger transatlantic relationship, and rededicated ourselves to building a safer, more prosperous world for future generations. . . .

. . . We commit to expand cooperation in research, innovation and new emerging technologies, and protection of intellectual property rights as strong drivers for increased trade and future economic growth. Our collaboration in the space domain also contributes to growth and global security, including on an International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities. We will combine wherever possible our efforts as we did in the Transatlantic Ocean Research Alliance and through the GPS/Galileo agreement. The Transatlantic Economic Council will continue its work to improve cooperation in emerging sectors, specifically e-mobility, e-health and new activities under the Innovation Action Partnership. . . .

. . . The transatlantic digital economy is integral to our economic growth, trade and innovation. Cross border data flows are critical to our economic vitality, and to our law enforcement and counterterrorism efforts. We affirm the need to promote data protection, privacy and free speech in the digital era while ensuring the security of our citizens. This is essential for trust in the online environment.

We have made considerable progress on a wide range of transnational security issues. We cooperate against terrorism in accordance with respect for human rights. Agreements such as the Passenger Name Record and Terrorist Finance Tracking Programme that prevent terrorism while respecting privacy are critical tools in our transatlantic cooperation. We will strengthen our coordination efforts to prevent and counter violent extremism. We will continue looking for appropriate mechanisms to counter the threats posed by fighters departing to Syria and other unstable regions, who return home where they may recruit new fighters, plan and conduct terrorist operations. We also work to address the threats posed by activities of groups contributing to instability in these regions. We welcome our increasingly close cooperation in building the capacity of partner countries to counter terrorism and violent extremism within a framework of rule of law, particularly in the Sahel, Maghreb, Horn of Africa region and Pakistan. We pledge to deepen and broaden this cooperation through the United Nations, the Global Counterterrorism Forum, and other relevant channels. We have also decided to expedite and enhance cooperation on threats directly affecting the security of EU and US diplomatic staff and facilities abroad.

Data protection and privacy are to remain an important part of our dialogue. We recall the steps already taken, including the EU-U.S. ad hoc Working Group, and take note of the European Commission Communication of 27 November 2013 and President Obama’s speech and Policy Directive of 17 January 2014. We will take further steps in this regard. We are committed to expedite negotiations of a meaningful and comprehensive data protection umbrella agreement for data exchanges in the field of police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters, including terrorism. We reaffirm our commitment in these negotiations to work to resolve the remaining issues, including judicial redress. By ensuring a high level of protection of personal data for citizens on both sides of the Atlantic, this agreement will facilitate transfers of data in this area. The United States and the EU will also boost effectiveness of the Mutual Legal Assistance Agreement – a key channel of cooperation in the digital era. In addition, we are committed to strengthening the Safe Harbour Framework in a comprehensive manner by summer 2014, to ensure data protection and enable trade through increased transparency, effective enforcement and legal certainty when data is transferred for commercial purposes.

The Internet has become a key global infrastructure. We share a commitment to a universal, open, secure, and reliable Internet, based on an inclusive, effective, and transparent multi-stakeholder model of governance. As such, we reaffirm that human rights apply equally online and offline, and we endeavour to strengthen and improve this model while working towards the further globalisation of core Internet institutions with the full involvement of all stakeholders. We look forward to the transition of key Internet domain name functions to the global multi-stakeholder community based on an acceptable proposal that has the community’s broad support. We acknowledge the good expert-level cooperation developed in the framework of the EU-US Working Group on Cyber Security and Cybercrime. We commend the political success of our joint initiative to launch a Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online, as the EU prepares to hand over the lead to the United States, and we decide to tackle jointly the issue of transnational child sex offenders. We reiterate our support for the Budapest Convention on cybercrime, and encourage its ratification and implementation. Building on all these achievements and guided by shared values, we have today decided to launch a comprehensive EU-US cyber dialogue to strengthen and further our cooperation including on various cyber-related foreign policy issues. . . .

Disasters Charter: Tsunami in Chile

The Disasters Charter was activated for a Tsunami in Chile:

Tsunami in Chile

Type of Event: Ocean Wave (Tsunami)
Location of Event: Chile
Date of Charter Activation: 02 April 2014
Charter Requestor: CONAE on behalf of ONEMI
Project Management:

Description of the Event
An 8.2 magnitude earthquake occurred off the northern coast of Chile at 23:46 UTC (20:46 local time) on 01 April 2014. Chilean authorities issued a tsunami alert and thousands of people have been evacuated from coastal areas.
Following the earthquake waves up to 2.1 m struck areas along the coast, including the cities of Pisagua, Patache and Iquique. The government of Chile recommended that anyone on the coast should evacuate and tens of thousands of people have done so, retreating to higher grounds. Many people have spent the night in hills nearby.

Despite the evacuations, however, five people have been reported killed so far, due to the impact and destruction caused by the waves. Landslides have also occurred and some roads have been blocked by debris in addition to power lines being cut. It has also been reported that 300 prisoners escaped from a prison in Iquique.

Magnitude 8 earthquakes on the Richter scale are at the higher end of the scale, and often cause major damage to affected areas. Chile is located in the “Ring of Fire”, an area of the Pacific Ocean basin that is seismologically active. This causes Chile to be prone to earthquakes and another powerful earthquake struck off the coat of Chile in 2010, resulting in devastation.

The tsunami warning was expected to last until 08:00 UTC on 02 April, and assessments of the damage and recovery will commence once the threat has passed.