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Category Archives: Etc.

BTLJ Writing Competition

Source – Berkeley Technology Law Journal:

Spring 2013 Writing Competition Rules
Posted on January 30, 2013 by BTLJ

1st Prize: $2,000 & Publication in the Fall 2013 Issue of BTLJ

2nd Prize: $750

3rd Prize: $500

Aldo J. Test Award for Best Berkeley Law Submission

Topics: We will accept submissions on a wide variety of topics at the intersection of law and technology, including but not limited to: intellectual property, antitrust, First Amendment, entertainment and new media, telecommunications, biotechnology, internet, and cybercrime.

Deadline: Submissions must be received by 5pm PST on March 1, 2013.

The competition is open to all J.D. candidates.

Each student may submit only one entry.

Submitted papers must be unpublished. Papers must be no more than 50 pages long, including footnotes. Do NOT use endnotes. Margins should be 1″, minimum. Body text must be double-spaced. Font must be Times New Roman or a similar serif font, and 12 point. Footnotes may be 10 pt and single-spaced but there should be a space between notes. Citations must conform to the 19th Ed. of The Bluebook. Submissions are judged anonymously, so the authors name should not appear anywhere on the paper.

To submit electronically, please send the completed cover sheet and a copy of your paper to btljwritingcompetition@gmail.com. Submissions MUST include a signed cover sheet that may be downloaded from the Journal website.

Winners will be notified and final results will appear on the Journal’s website in late spring. Due to the large number of entries, the Journal cannot contact other entrants.

Submit an electronic copy of your (1) paper and (2) cover sheet to:

btljwritingcompetition@gmail.com

*To be eligible for publication, the winning article must meet the Journal’s publication standards.*

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In Memoriam: Prof. Richard Barnes

With sadness we report the passing of University of Mississippi Law School Professor Richard Barnes. He was a friend of the Center and a very kind and caring individual. He will be missed by the law school community. From the Law School’s website:

Professor Richard Barnes Dies in Car Accident
Posted on January 22, 2013

It is with deep regret and sadness that we report the loss of our own Richard Barnes, Leonard B. Melvin Distinguished Lecturer and Professor of Law. Barnes was killed on January 22, 2013 in a car accident between Conway, Ark. and Little Rock as he was driving home to Oxford.

Barnes was a member of the faculty since 1989, and he taught contracts, secured transactions, commercial law and Federal Indian Law. Barnes was also selected twice by the law school student body as the Professor of the Year.

In Memoriam: William D. English

With sadness we note the passing of William D. English. His obituary in The Washington Post states:

William D. English, 88, a lawyer who specialized in satellite telecommunications and who retired as general counsel of the satellite phone communications system Iridium, died Jan. 3 at his home in Bethesda. He had Parkinson’s disease.

His wife, Nancy English, confirmed the death.

Mr. English came to the Washington area in the early 1950s to work as a trial lawyer in the Justice Department’s criminal division. From 1956 to 1962, he was a senior lawyer at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, where he worked on negotiations involving nuclear inspections and transport as well as the development of nuclear power plants.

In the late 1960s, he was an assistant general counsel at the new Communications Satellite Corp. (Comsat), the federally created provider of satellite telecommunications. He also became counsel to the board of Intelsat, the global communications satellite system. He played a key role in joint ventures between Comsat and satellite communications entities in other countries.

Mr. English remained a top legal executive with telecommunications businesses including Satellite Business Systems, a satellite communications venture of Comsat, IBM and the Aetna life insurance company.

From 1992 until his retirement in 1996, Mr. English was senior vice president and general counsel of Iridium. The company, then a subsidiary of Motorola, went bankrupt but has since been revived. . . .

Neil Alden Armstrong, first human on the Moon, dies

 

Neil Alden Armstrong

August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012

 American NASA astronaut, test pilot, aerospace engineer, university professor, United States Naval Aviator, and the first person to set foot upon the Moon.

“Neil Armstrong was also a reluctant American hero who always believed he was just doing his job,” said a statement from his family.

That’s one small step for Man, one giant step for Mankind
Neil Armstrong from the Moon, July 20, 1969

President Obama’s Statement on Neil Armstrong’s Death

NASA Administrator Statement on Neil Armstrong’s Death

Buzz Aldrin’s Statement on the Death of Neil Armstrong

In Memorium: Jon van Dyke

It is with sadness that we report the passing of Prof. Jon van Dyke. Jon collaborated with the National Center for Remote Sensing, Air, and Space Law during the first and second Pacific Rim Space Law Conferences. Our thoughts go out to his family and friends. As U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka said in the Honolulu Star Advertiser obituary:

“Jon always stood up for what he felt was pono — right and just,” Akaka said. “He was an inspiration for our community and his students. Because of Jon’s work, the principle of protecting our cultural and historic resources has been preserved, and the tradition of sharing the resources of our beautiful beaches and other natural resources with all continues to be honored.”

Nowak Pleads Guilty

by P.J. Blount with the blog faculty

Not really space law, but notable. From Red Orbit:

Nowak Pleads Guilty, Receives Probation

Posted on: Wednesday, 11 November 2009, 06:06 CST

On Tuesday, former NASA astronaut Lisa Nowak pleaded guilty to reduced charges and avoided jail time for her 2007 attack on a romantic rival.

Nowak apologized in court to her victim, which was former Air Force Captain Colleen Shipman, before being sentenced to a year on probation.

“I am sincerely sorry to cause fear and misunderstanding and all of the intense public exposure … I hope very much that we can move forward from this in privacy,” Nowak said after the judge directed her to turn and face Shipman.

Nowak drove over 1,000 miles from Houston to Orlando International Airport on February 5, 2007 to assault Shipman with pepper spray. . . . [Full Story]